Two Takes Later

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Paul Desmond likely intended his seminal cool jazz work, “Take Five”, to refer to taking a brief respite from labor. However, an alternative interpretation is that of taking multiple attempts to record a desired artistic feat. In that spirit, this work imagines a take that occurred slightly later in the session - two takes later, perhaps. Featuring a jazz quartet of piano, upright bass, drums, and clarinet.

F A B

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Unaccompanied clarinet explores a simple yet rich thematic space in this improvised track. Played in a single live take with minimal processing - some ambient noise is still purposefully present. This track is intended as a mirror - allow yourself to reflect while listening.

Battle at Iritjinga

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Having arrived at Iritjinga, our intrepid explorers are in for a surprise - they’re not alone. However, they were not entirely unprepared for this eventuality. Will they withstand the mysterious ambush and continue their journey? This track portrays their struggle with a fusion of synthesizers, orchestral instruments (trumpet and strings), and really big drums.

This track is a followup of Journey to Iritjinga.

Peking Order

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This track features authentic Chinese instruments, including the distinctively reedy hulusi as well as strummed guzheng and blown ocarina. A variety of gongs, bells, drones, and pads round out the instrumentation, with a bit of percussive hitting and an odd sproing in the background.

Two Times Two Times Two

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2**3 => 8: the magic number of low resolution yet high sentiment. This mostly 8-bit waltz may not have much entropy, but its signal will surely evoke reminiscences.

Bogoroditse Devo

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This track reimagines Sergei Rachmaninoff’s moving chorale, Bogoroditse Devo, using the signature sound of the Mellotron. It is in homage to Isao Tomita, one of the first to take classical music and recreate it with electronic technology.